Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Remote charging of battery, via OBD2 connector

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    37

    Remote charging of battery, via OBD2 connector

    Greetings All, it's one of those things that I'd been getting 'roud to. I finally found my 'round 2 it' because I'd parked my Brabus 42 in the shed with the passenger door up against the wall and the battery went flat - left a light on - bugger. Just as well I'd already bought the connectors off evilbay. So I needed to get the grey stuff working on how it should be done.
    Hopefully the photos turn out to show the bits and finished product. I'll leave it up to you to decide how you'd like to get from parts to finished product but you need the connector connections from fq101, a soldering iron and solder, an OBD2 connector, a suitable sized fuse holder and 10 amp fuse, a drill and assorted drill, rat tail file, suitable size wire, terminals of red and black, so you can clip your battery charger to the device plus the know how.
    The advantage of the device is you don't have to access the battery to attach your trickle charger to the battery. This will NOT work if you want to 'jump start' the car with a remote battery and leads. If you tried, all you'd do is burn out the wiring and possibly set fire to the car - so be warned, don't try. What I'm suggesting here is only to keep the battery fully charged over lengthy periods of time of the car not being used. It's only to be used with a low current charger or solar panel.
    It's up to you to decide if you're capable to do what I've suggested or get someone to make it for you.IMG_5266.jpgIMG_5265.jpg
    The finished product is on the left side of the photos, the connector parts are on the right side.
    Cheers, Ian.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Devon
    Posts
    42
    I added a motorcycle charging cable to the battery on my ForTwo. It's fused, waterproof (though hopefully all leaks now fixed!) and tucks under the carpet when not being used. I have a couple of motorcycles and a selection of chargers; all the chargers have been modified to use the same SAE connector style and I have made up extension leads and cables with croc clips so any charger will plug into any vehicle or I can charge a battery out of the car/bike. I also have an SAE to cigarette lighter socket cable so I could also use it to power accessories.

    I really only needed this whilst the car was off-road being worked on for a long period, but it's useful to have.

    2024553.jpg

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    37
    Greetings Mikerj, yep thought about that as well and it's a good idea. I decided on the OBD2 connector arrangement as once made it can be used on any car fitted with the OBD2 protocol, using the unmodified car wiring. Cheers, Ian.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    743
    Quote Originally Posted by mad smart person View Post
    a suitable sized fuse holder and 10 amp fuse

    The advantage of the device is you don't have to access the battery to attach your trickle charger to the battery. This will NOT work if you want to 'jump start' the car with a remote battery and leads. If you tried, all you'd do is burn out the wiring and possibly set fire to the car - so be warned, don't try.
    Surely you choose the appropriate fuse for the job in hand to accommodate the charge/current levels you're envisioning and the downstream cables/route involved.

    A trickle charge in my view is nothing more than say 5A
    With that in mind a 3 or 5A fuse will be much safer than a 10A fuse , it'll accommodate a trickle charge and nothing more before blowing safely.
    You're so money supermarket and you don't even know it!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Cornwall
    Posts
    102
    I use a small solar panel mounted on the back of my garage, mainly because it's a small lock-up and doesn't have any power. The panel is approx 450mm x 350mm and produces 20watts max through a controller, which I hasten to add is a must to stop overcharging. The total cost less than 40, it's been in use now for approx 18-months and has never let me down, even through the winter months where there are a lot less daylight hours. Apparently the panels start to lose some of their efficiency after 3-years, maybe 20% or so but who cares there so cheap and easy to replace.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    37
    Greetings, yep, the fuse choice is up to whomever but I used a 10 amp and wouldn't suggest any more and definitely NOT a 'slow blow' fuse. Sorry for the following pun but the charger I have is a 'smart charger', the sort that will charge the new and fancy car batteries, it'll also do the old lead acid type. It's maximum output is 10 amp, I'd not use anything more than ten amp.
    Cheers, Ian.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    37
    Greetings, I can see this'll open up more questions, I never knew solor panels had such a short life of efficiency? Considering they use a lot of earths raw resources in their manufacture they may not be as 'green', as we're lead to believe? As to over charging, any battery is best left fully charged before resting for long periods. As batteries get older, they build up internal resistance which is counter productive to them being fully charged be an alternator. A generator is best for fully charging an aged battery. But as batteries age, they can also 'calcify', new technology has chargers (and alternators?) that 'condition' these batteries as they charge. Not sure how the Smart car alternator charges - 'old skool or new skool', but I do know they are very hard to test on the bench, in the old way. So me thinks a Smart car alternator is a lot like the Smart car it's self - just too smart for its own good.
    But I still love them to bits. I wonder how a male Smart car would behave?????
    PS, it's mothers day here, better go and make her a cup of tea.
    Cheers, Ian.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    37
    "even through the winter months where there are a lot less daylight hours."
    Greetings, you mean there's a difference between summer and winter in Blighty - we were told you guys only get 2 days of summer???
    You're right though, a solar panel is a great way of keeping the battery topped up, anywhere on the planet.
    And works wel in cloudy conditions, you only need to be in 'day light' hours.
    With an OBD2 connector attached to the end of the wires, you could use it on any modern car fitted with OBD2 protocol wiring, without modifying the car to save getting access to the battery.
    Cheers, Ian.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Burnley
    Posts
    1,212
    OBD spec is 4 amp so no way should you use a fuse any bigger than that.

    I am not sure but I also think that the 12 volt is an output and is specified as such so while feeding power into it shouldn't do any damage there is always the chance that it may as it is not specified as a power input.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    37
    Greetings, thanks for that info, take note then. Probably best then if this complete post stream is removed. To save any possible problems.
    Cheers, Ian.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •