Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Remote charging of battery, via OBD2 connector

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    37
    Greetings, being worried by what has transpired above, I dug a little deeper, not wanting to offer duff info. Googling obd2 comes up with pin 16, positive, 12 volts 4 amp. FQ 101 on the other hand has in fuse arrangements, for the obd2, fuse #11 - 7.5 amp and fuse #20 - 15 amp. I'd suspect #11 is the switched 12v and #20 is the 'hot' battery 12v. All rather confusing really? No pun intended. I'll leave it up to individuals to decide for themselves. Cheers, Ian.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Burnley
    Posts
    1,197
    The specification says 4 amps so a manufacturer can use damp cotton or spaghetti to take the wire to the plug and as long as it is capable of passing 4 amps then the manufacturer is conforming to the specification which he must do for the type approval (UK) to be valid. If the plug is capable of passing more than that then so be it.

    This is one of the problems. If ti is specified as 4 amps as the Internet seems to be saying then it should be possible to apply a direct short circuit from the power pin to ground and nothing will happen other than 4 amps will flow in the wire you use. Clearly that is not the case, it would blow the fuse or burn your car or some such other disadvantageous occurrence so basically '12 volt, 4 amps' is not specified completely, I suspect there will be more spec somewhere.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    298
    Another option would be a flying ciggy socket

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/380368126718

    main_hw-lighter-1.jpg
    Paul
    Pure 2000 W, LHD 599cc - Engine Rebuilt Feb 08 - sold
    Passion 2000 W, LHD 599cc - Engine Rebuilt Mar 09 - sold
    Passion 1998 T, LHD 599cc - Engine Rebuilt Apr 10 - sold
    Cabrio 2001 Y, LHD 599cc - Engine Rebuilt Jul 10 Replaced Oct 16

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    740
    Quote Originally Posted by Mjolinor View Post
    then it should be possible to apply a direct short circuit from the power pin to ground and nothing will happen other than 4 amps will flow in the wire you use..
    The only way that would happen is if there was a ~3ohm resistance in series somewhere behind the socket on that 12v line, which there isn't.
    I guess it's just there for specifications sake , I'm absolutely sure you could draw or inject >4amps , but tracks and wire will soon give in as a virtual 4amp fuse...ish.

    Ps:You should know damp cotton, nor spaghetti has a 4amp UL rating , rather it is 4 culinary amps.
    You're so money supermarket and you don't even know it!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Burnley
    Posts
    1,197
    Quote Originally Posted by reinaldo_is_spam View Post
    The only way that would happen is if there was a ~3ohm resistance in series somewhere behind the socket on that 12v line, which there isn't.
    I guess it's just there for specifications sake , I'm absolutely sure you could draw or inject >4amps , but tracks and wire will soon give in as a virtual 4amp fuse...ish.

    Ps:You should know damp cotton, nor spaghetti has a 4amp UL rating , rather it is 4 culinary amps.
    I was thinking more of an active 4 amp current limit circuit such as a MOSFET.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    740
    Quote Originally Posted by Mjolinor View Post
    I was thinking more of an active 4 amp current limit circuit such as a MOSFET.
    Yes could be
    You're so money supermarket and you don't even know it!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •