Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Too buy or not too buy, that is the question!!!!!!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    new Forest
    Posts
    74

    Too buy or not too buy, that is the question!!!!!!!

    Hi all,
    I have all but decided on my next Smart car, a nice 2006 Passion Cabriolet, but my Wife is bit concerned about the carrying capacity.
    Our last Smart a 450 Passion fortwo was able to carry 2 medium suitcases and we were always able to get the weekly shopping in the boot. My question is: How easy is it to get 2 medium sized suitcases in the back of a Cabriolet? would we have to lower the roof? and how do you open and get things in the boot? is it just a matter of opening the boot door like a fixed roof Smart or is there more to it?
    Cheers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Somewhere on the Wirral
    Posts
    129
    The boot on a 450 cabriolet is still a split boot affair that opens with the bottom first, then two clips in the corners to lift the back section of the roof up (so the Coupe in reverse order). The boot on my brothers 2004 Cabriolet has a microswitch above the numberplate to open it from the outside. As far as carrying capacity goes, it is a little less square than the Coupe and does impinge a little into the available space. You'd have to physically try it but I seriously doubt the roof would need to be lowered.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    new Forest
    Posts
    74
    Thanks for that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    new Forest
    Posts
    74
    Turned down the Cabriolet, it had a really rough interior. Now I"m considering a 2009 CDI, but I have read bad reports concerning the DPF. The CDI that I want to go and see is about thirty miles from me, do all 2009 CDIs have a DPF? I read one forum where the owner of a CDI had his DPF removed, is this legal? and if so what is involved? I"ve just found out that the CDI I am interested in is a 2009 45bhp model, does this mean it does not have a DPF fitted?
    Last edited by mudinuri007; 20-06-2017 at 08:44 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Burnley
    Posts
    1,270
    Not all 2009 have a DPF. They started fitting it mid year so an early one will not have one.

    How to tell, hmm. No throttle body on a non-DPF, no pipes coming out of the exhaust or sensors screwed into it other than the lambda sensor. No pressure differential sensor on the non-DPF. You can see that by looking through the slots under the boot lid. The far left one has the pressure sensor visible fastened to the end of the chassis.

    There are probably other ways to tell but not shouting at me right now.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Wells
    Posts
    1,540
    45hp not 54hp

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    new Forest
    Posts
    74
    Not with you lil.smartie.
    What do you mean 45hp not 54hp

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Somewhere on the Wirral
    Posts
    129
    In the middle of 2009, the 45bhp CDi, which doesn't have a DPF, had a power increase to 54bhp which then does include the DPF. I would be hesitant though of solely relying on the power figure quoted though, I've seen adverts saying "CDi MHD" and "84bhp MHD" in the past, both of which are inaccurate. I think Mjolinor's advice should help in identifying what type it is.

    I test drove a 451 45bhp CDi Cabriolet once. The engine was lovely, couldn't really tell it was a diesel on the move.
    Last edited by Ocracoke; 20-06-2017 at 01:42 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Central Scotland
    Posts
    428
    Now I"m considering a 2009 CDI, but I have read bad reports concerning the DPF.

    I have a 451....2010 Cdi with PDF, have owned it secondhand for three years now and it works fine, in fact you hardly ever spot the burn cycle, except if you are stationary at the lights when it is cycling (a very rare event), the revs sit a bit higher, so you notice it. The DPF came on the Cdi on the 59 plate onwards (half way through 2009).

    But would say to you now if you are considering the Cdi with DPF, is that the car cannot be used as a city car, ie, low mileage runs at slow speeds or you will clog up the DPF with soot. The car must have higher speed runs with further distance journeys so that the burn cycle operates.

    There is a check given by the cars computer if you are not doing this, as the car will revert to limp mode without the engine management light coming on, and can be reset by stopping the car and starting up again after a few minutes wait.

    Limp mode is gawd awful as the car will not accelerate, and has to be put up the gears to get moving at all, and will not climb hills, it is a pure criminal feature.

    In three years driving, limp mode happened to me only once, due to doing slow and small journeys for two weeks (which I should not have been doing, but had to visit a local hospital each day with a sick relative in it), I then blasted the car on the motorway at 60 MPH and some 70 MPH for a long journey, the burn cycle came in to clear soot, and its never had a repeat of the limp mode situation again. Thank goodness.

    So you have been warned about Cdi with DPF, it is not a city car.

    Advantages of the Cdi....
    The engine is very low reving in fact I am hardly ever above 2000 RPM, its optimum rev speed for this engine, this makes it very quiet for a diesel, as once up to speed there is very little noise off the back compartment where the engine is.

    Also I get 80 MPG compared to the petrol version which is just over half of that, so just put up with the disadvantage of it not being a city car. But I knew that when I bought it. Also it is zero road tax and cheap to insure (dependent on your personal circumstances, re: NCB, etc).

    PS....I note mention of 451 MHD petrol cars above (with start/stop function and button), just never buy one of these as there is an inherant fault of poor aligned drive belts, that can wear and snap, and overheat the engine to destruction. There is no fix for these cars, and must be avoided at all costs.
    Last edited by colin2x2; 20-06-2017 at 02:58 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Burnley
    Posts
    1,270
    I cannot tell a difference in power between the 45 and the 54 when driving. My 54 was a dog to sort out when I got it a few months ago but since then the only problem I have is that when I am two up and gunning it then it will occasionally slip into safe mode. I have not really had a concerted attempt at fixing this as it so rarely happens and I cannot force it to happen, that makes it damned hard to fix.

    The DPF regeneration is normally passive, that is to say that no modifications to fuel injection amount or timing take place if you regularly do some motorway driving such that the exhaust gets hot enough on its own. If you do not do motorway driving regularly then the engine may go into "active regeneration" mode whereby more fuel is pumped in and timing is altered to allow un-burnt fuel to enter the exhaust and set fire to the soot that has stored in the DPF.

    I think I have been running this now for about three months. A tank of fuel will last me maybe three weeks so I have only had about 4 or 5 tanks through it and the car has never entered active regeneration mode. No faults and drives like a dream. I am getting about 50 mpg and all my driving is local. Maybe once a tankful I will go on a motorway but only because I need to, not in any way is it to force a regen.
    Last edited by Mjolinor; 20-06-2017 at 05:30 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •