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Thread: Air con fixing.

  1. #1
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    Air con fixing.

    All this talk of air con of late has made me think about fixing mine.

    Questions:

    What refrigerant do they want (R134A)?
    What are the connectors called?

    I think I have all the stuff I need apart from the connectors and the gas.

  2. #2
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    60 air con re-gas and anti bacterial treatment at ATS for 32 via a Groupon voucher at the moment.

    I just had mine done and they were very professional and efficient

    It's nearly as cheap as buying the gas and DIY ......

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mjolinor View Post
    All this talk of air con of late has made me think about fixing mine..
    If it's been out of commission for too long expect dried out seals. The seals AFAIK are in the compressor....

    Quote Originally Posted by Mjolinor View Post
    What are the connectors called?
    .
    Schrader?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBW View Post
    60 air con re-gas and anti bacterial treatment at ATS for 32 via a Groupon voucher at the moment.

    I just had mine done and they were very professional and efficient

    It's nearly as cheap as buying the gas and DIY ......
    I think there is no point paying for a re-gas, it has been too long probably. I have gauges, nitrogen and a vac pump so I need to test it before committing to gas.

    I do have some refrigerant but it is for a commercial freezer, reckon it would not work too well in an A/C.

  5. #5
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    Dec 2015
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    Greetings, if you've got the kit to do the leak test, I'd suggest you get the sorted first. There are lots of places for a leak to occur and not just the seals on the compressor. As to the gas, R20 has not been used for a long time and really should not be used at all - but then you guys don't have the 'ozone hole' above you, so do you care??????? There have been a few refrigerant gasses tried since banning the use of R20 - etc. There's a label, or should be, which you should see when you lift the carpet over the engine compartment which states what gas to use and the amount. You are correct in thinking not to mix gasses, the seals are designed for one gas, not all gasses, so using the wrong gas will destroy the seals. Good to see you're thinking of sorting your air/cond, heading into winter, you'll have it sorted for Spring. Good things take time and shouldn't be rushed into. Cheers, Ian.

  6. #6
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    R134A is the gas to use. Just about to sort out air on on a Toyota Yaris Verso. Leaks can be anywhere so the only way to find them is to apply pressure and keep looking.
    Drives a Smart Cdi - 65 to 85 MPG

  7. #7
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    OK so that's those two points sorted now how do I know if there is oil in the pump. I don't know if this has leaked or been disconnected. I do know that the car was supposed to have had a new clutch just before I got it and the general plumbing around the engine was all over the place so it is possible that the pump has been off and maybe the oil in there has been removed / spilt.

    How do I check that, can you dip where the pipes connect?

  8. #8
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    Checking amount of oil in AC systems is difficult. Compressor usually has no sight glass and oil may collect anywhere in system if poorly designed such that oil can collect in pockets.
    Best way is to drain oil from compressor and measure its volume.
    Drives a Smart Cdi - 65 to 85 MPG

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tolsen View Post
    Checking amount of oil in AC systems is difficult. Compressor usually has no sight glass and oil may collect anywhere in system if poorly designed such that oil can collect in pockets.
    Best way is to drain oil from compressor and measure its volume.
    That involves removing it and turning it upside down doesn't it? Or is there a drain plug?

  10. #10
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    If there's a drain plug - there's surely a fill/level plug. Could (like small industrial gearboxes) be filled before assembly completed. In which case a partial strip down required to access oil. Or, if there's no obvious sign of leakage past the seal, take it on trust that the oil level is fine.
    Not sure you will get refrigeration compressor oil in less that industrial quantity anyway - eg 20l minimum.

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