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Thread: Clutch Drag Point - Delphi DS150E

  1. #1
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    Clutch Drag Point - Delphi DS150E

    I have a quick question about Delphi DS150E when setting the clutch drag point.

    Once the routine has been run Delphi comes back with a percentage figure, what does that figure indicate and should that figure be as close as possible to 100%?

    I ran the above yesterday and it completed with a figure of 36% - does this mean that the clutch actuator (brand new) needs re-positioning under the car as I know its requires 50nm of pressure to be applied to the actuator before bolting up with 10nm of torque on each of the three E10 bolts?

  2. #2
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    I have no knowledge of drag point - though I've seen it discussed (some time ago) probably by Tolsen.

    Quote Originally Posted by BobbaFett View Post
    does this mean that the clutch actuator (brand new) needs re-positioning under the car as I know its requires 50nm of pressure to be applied to the actuator before bolting up with 10nm of torque on each of the three E10 bolts?

    I was told by a guy who used to maintain smarts as his day job that pre-loading was correct when the actuator rod could just be rotated between fore finger and thumb. That's how I did mine three years ago and it's been fine - though could probably do with a re-teach. If that helps...

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    Thats a really good tip, thank you

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobbaFett View Post
    Thats a really good tip, thank you
    Thanks go to Perks for that one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pinger View Post
    I was told by a guy who used to maintain smarts as his day job that pre-loading was correct when the actuator rod could just be rotated between fore finger and thumb. That's how I did mine three years ago and it's been fine - though could probably do with a re-teach. If that helps...
    Ziggactly, it shouldn’t be pushing on the arm, neither should there be a play gap, so just being able to turn it is spot on.
    You're so money supermarket and you don't even know it!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by reinaldo_is_spam View Post
    Ziggactly, it shouldn’t be pushing on the arm, neither should there be a play gap, so just being able to turn it is spot on.
    It SHOULD be pushing on the arm, that's what the Sachs specified preload is for.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikerj View Post
    It SHOULD be pushing on the arm, that's what the Sachs specified preload is for.
    It's a contentious issue that has been argued here before.
    As I recall, the case for pre-load is to maintain pressure on the release bearing such that it is constantly rotating and not having to be accelerated into motion on each gear change.
    If that is all - then almost a matter of belief as to which is better.
    Given that the weakest point is the rod punching a hole through the arm (not the bearing failing), what is best for it is probably what matters. Opinion divided there also. Is constant pressure better than slight fretting to avoid wear?

  8. #8
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    Grease release fork sockets for smoother operation, less wear and rust protection.
    Correct preload ensures no slack in mechanism. Slack in mechanism causes wood pecker effect, unnecessary wear and slower gear changes.
    Drives a Smart Cdi - 65 to 85 MPG

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikerj View Post
    It SHOULD be pushing on the arm, that's what the Sachs specified preload is for.
    Iíll re-phrase it , it shouldnít be pushing the arm from its position when the actuator isnít in place.

    ensures no slack in mechanism
    Singing from the same hymn sheet really, just arguing on semantics
    You're so money supermarket and you don't even know it!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinger View Post
    It's a contentious issue that has been argued here before.
    As I recall, the case for pre-load is to maintain pressure on the release bearing such that it is constantly rotating and not having to be accelerated into motion on each gear change.
    If that is all - then almost a matter of belief as to which is better.
    Given that the weakest point is the rod punching a hole through the arm (not the bearing failing), what is best for it is probably what matters. Opinion divided there also. Is constant pressure better than slight fretting to avoid wear?
    Why would the manufacturer of the clutch and actuator give a detailed explanation of the steps to go through to set this preload accurately if it was not important?

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