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Thread: Our 450 Has Become Possesed.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Caerphilly
    Posts
    24

    Our 450 Has Become Possesed.

    I unlock the doors, I get in and start the engine, engage drive or reverse and the car refuses to move. As I increase the revs, it sits back on the rear wheels which seem to be locked in some way and wont move an inch. I'm afraid of giving it too much throttle in case I do some damage.
    It's happened once or twice before, but then cleared itself quite quickly, but now it seems permanent. Any thoughts anyone?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ecosse
    Posts
    3,728
    Handbrake stuck, or rather, rear brake shoes stuck to the drum. My car does this (if I don't take preventative measures) and it is a proper PITA. Twice it has pushed the clutch into burning/smelling before it freed. Good luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Ecosse
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    Rear brake shoes stuck to the drum - a proper PITA. Twice mine has nearly taken the clutch out before they freed. Worth getting a length of steel bar and placing one end on the drum through the slots in the wheel and hammering to shock it free. If only one is stuck the car should swing toward the stuck side when attempting to move it (as in how a tank steers). If you do the steel bar thing you will have to chock a wheel as when it frees the car will be off unless on perfectly level ground. Good luck!

    Chock wheel is because it wont free with the handbrake still applied and being in gear isn't enough.
    Last edited by pinger; 21-02-2020 at 07:48 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Caerphilly
    Posts
    24
    Thanks fellers, I thought it might be the handbrake stuck on, but then ruled it out because it is so solidly immobile. My experience of a seized handbrake with another car in the past is that the car will move a bit. If it ever stops raining I'll check it out
    Thanks again.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ecosse
    Posts
    3,728
    It isn't the handbrake being seized on despite the handbrake being on that caused it. When you release the handbrake, the handbrake mechanism releases - but the shoes are stuck fast to the drum. Wet weather and left with the handbrake on for any length of time causes it. Early on with smarts the front pads used to do the same until the pad material was altered. They'd stick badly enough to rip the lining off the steel backing plate. 21st century and ****e like this.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    BANCHORY
    Posts
    3,380
    It is guaranteed to be stuck rear brake shoes if rear end squats when you attempt to move forward.
    Drives a Smart Cdi - 65 to 85 MPG

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    BANCHORY
    Posts
    3,380
    Your rear brakes need servicing if frequently stuck.


    Clean out dust. Clean linings and drum with brake cleaner. Grease raised areas of anchor plate where inboard edge of brake shoes touch.
    Drives a Smart Cdi - 65 to 85 MPG

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    44
    Greetings All, I'd concur, brake shoes stuck to drum. So, how to un-stuck them? Try this, make sure the gearbox is in NEUTRAL, chock the front wheels, both of them, to stop the car rolling fore OR aft. Release the hand brake. Jack up one of the rear wheels, if the shoes are stuck on you won't need to loosen the wheel studs before jacking. Remove the wheel and lay it flat under the car, so if the car falls of the jack, it shouldn't crush you as well. Remove the torque screw that secures the brake drum to the hub. Now, with a hammer 'tap' the brake drum, around its edge go round the edge tapping away, eventually it should break free of the shoes. (don't forget to put the torque screw back before putting the wheel on) Of course, if the wheel starts to turn as you're undoing the wheel studs, with the wheel off the ground, there's not much point in progressing further other than to tighten the wheel studs, lower the car and progress to the other side. If you'd like to do a proper job, once the drum has freed itself, remove the drum and with water and scotch bright, clean up the internal surface of the where the shoe rubs. Give the shoes a bit of a clean as well. But, if you do this, take the car for a good drive soon afterwards to dry off the brakes and drums. Don't use sand paper, unless you really give everything a really good clean, as you'll leave bits of carborundum behind, which will not be conducive to brake long life. The use of flammable fluid is not a good idea either - particularly if you smoke. Moving forward, if you park the car long term - a few weeks or longer - park it on level ground, preferably concrete, not grass, with the gearbox selected to Reverse and leave the hand brake off. The car should not move, more than an inch or two - if you rocked it, as the gearbox is 'locked'.
    Hope this helps.
    Cheers, Ian.

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